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    « No Sweat Solar-Tech | Main | #solarpumped »
    Wednesday
    Oct212015

    Meet the lotus

    What do you get when you mix one signature drink, a custom fountain display, 150+ people, and a spacious new art gallery in Yangon? A product launch; Proximity-style.

    On October 15, 2015, Design Team co-leaders, Taiei Harimoto and Ko Aung Ko Ko unveiled the Lotus, a radically affordable, solar-powered irrigation pump for low-income farmers in Myanmar.

    As Myanmar began opening in 2011, the agricultural landscape also experienced significant change. Cheap diesel engines from China flowed into the market and many farmers invested in them as a way to mechanize their operations, only to find them dirty, difficult to operate, and expensive to run. “This presented an opportunity for us,” Product Designer Taiei Harimoto explained during the product launch. “Our customers’ irrigation methods are no longer the same,” he continued, “which means that they have new needs that we can design for.”

    Having identified this opportunity, Proximity embarked on an intensive human-centered design process to create the Lotus, which is unlike any other solar-powered irrigation pump in the world. Designed specifically for the local market, it is a submersible pump that fits neatly into the two-inch (50 mm) wide tube-wells found commonly in rural Myanmar—at its widest, the Lotus is 49mm in diameter. When working at a depth of 24ft, the Lotus pump can yield over 15,000 liters of water per day. The Lotus is also likely to be the world’s most affordable solar pump, retailing at only US$345, which includes 260W of solar panels. Most solar irrigation pumps available on the market cost several thousand dollars.

    Most importantly, the Lotus makes sustainable farming easy. Although smallholder farmers each own only a few acres of land, they have an immense collective impact on the health of our food systems. The Lotus will provide Myanmar farmers with sustainable options that are also cost saving.

    The Design Team’s unveiling of the new product was followed by a spirited discussion of its specs and limitations: How long does the Lotus last? Lifecycle testing has shown that it will serve customers for at least two seasons. Will there be financing available for farmers who can’t afford the upfront cost? For the first sales season, Proximity is not offering financing, in part to gauge what the demand is for the product now and to determine what type of financing might be optimal for this product. How long is the payback period for farmers switching from diesel engines to solar-powered irrigation? Ten months on average, and the payback period is even shorter for farmers switching from treadle pumps to the Lotus.

    We want to thank everyone who joined to celebrate with us, and if you weren’t able to make it, we will be releasing a short film about the event and how the Lotus is made in Myanmar in the coming weeks!

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