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    « What is it like to work at Proximity for 11 years? | Main | A Proximity Love Story »
    Thursday
    Feb192015

    Daw Win Thein is not a Proximity Customer, here’s why

     

    Daw Win Thein, 54, and her husband, U Sein Thaung, have some of the greenest thumbs we’ve come across. From a chili bush hidden amid the rows of betel plants, to the majestic pineapple plants that line the edge of their 1.5-acre plot, there’s something growing in every nook and cranny. The bounty of it is impressive, especially when Daw Win Thein explains that the long gourds, betel nuts and fruits are all for household consumption. For income, the pair grows chrysanthemums and betel leaves, which they irrigate with the help of an engine pump. 

    Daw Win looks apologetic as she explains that she has nothing against Proximity’s products; her husband first purchased a pump in 2004, and both their daughters use treadle pumps that have been working since 2006. But now that the family has a diesel engine, she only needs her treadle pump as a safe guard in case the engine is broken or to draw water for household use.

    Daw Win has nothing to apologize for. The fact that she’s been able to upgrade is a sign that Proximity’s products are working. Before the family first purchased the pump in 2006, they barely found enough time to tend to the betel plants, and the hand pump she was using made Daw Win’s chest hurt. Over the years, Daw Win doubled the number of betel plants that her family harvested, and she started growing chrysanthemums to supplement their income. It was this additional income that allowed the family to purchase a diesel engine. 

    In essence, what Daw Win’s story tells us is that Proximity’s products are helping households throughout Myanmar save, improve their farms, and access machinery that was previously out of reach. But what does her story mean for our business model? After all, as a social enterprise we rely on business principles to generate social impact, so what happens now that Daw Win has outgrown our treadle pumps?

    It means we go back to the drawing board. It means we look at recent growth in the diesel engine market as a design challenge. We learn everything we can about these engines and their benefits, to see how we can help smallholder farmers in Myanmar access solutions that are even more affordable and sustainable. Proximity’s design team is nearing the end of a two-year project to create a solar-powered irrigation product that will help farmers like Daw Win upgrade once again, from a diesel engine that relies on costly fossil fuels to a clean energy solution that’s durable and cost-saving. Looking back on the past decade, this upcoming product is the natural continuation of a process that began with Daw Win's first treadle pump back in 2004.  

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