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    « Proximity Designs in the Harvard Business Review | Main | What is it like to work at Proximity for 11 years? »
    Tuesday
    Mar102015

    Hand in Hand

     

    This moment was captured on Saturday, February 28th. One of the hands belongs to U Win Saw, a farmer in Mawgyun Township whose land has been affected by saltwater intrusion for generations. Unlike other farmers who can grow two rice crops a year, he had to make do with the income from just one rice harvest.

    The other hand belongs to Ko San Aung Thu, a member of our Farm Advisory Services team. For the last seven months, he’s been working with U Win Saw to help him shift the traditional harvesting calendar and plant short-life varieties of rice. The aim is to help U Win Saw harvest two crops per year, saltwater and all.

    On Saturday, February 28th, months of hard labor came to a close. U Win Saw was about to put his second yearly harvest through the thresher, and only then would he know how much money he’d make for his first ever post-monsoon crop. The excitement was palpable, and as a group of laborers and farmers awaited the results, U Win Saw took Ko San Aung Thu’s hand. While it’s not uncommon in Myanmar for men to hold hands, in this moment, the trust that had grown between both men was clear.

    For a low-income farmer in rural Myanmar, changing farming techniques can theoretically endanger the brunt of a household’s yearly income. Understandably, a lot of farmers are hesitant to try something new, which is why building trust among farmers is the first and most crucial step in the work of Proximity’s Farm Advisory Services Team. When a farmer agrees, like U Win Saw did, to try double cropping, a member of FAS will visit the farm twice a month to make sure everything is going as planned. In addition to building long lasting relationships between FAS staff and local farmers, these visits ensure that we're up-to-date on the latest pest outbreaks and challenges farmers are facing nationwide. 

    This year, for the first time ever, U Win Saw was able to harvest 210 baskets of post-monsoon rice; that means an additional US $1,100 in income that will allow him to save, invest in his farm, and feel more secure about providing for his family year round.

     

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