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    Entries in guest blog (1)

    Monday
    Nov032014

    Designing with the user

     

     

    Fresh off the boat (well, in this case, the plane), Steve Frechette is our Energy Team’s new Business Advisor and extrovert extraordinaire. When he’s not devouring every Burmese treat under the sun, he’s blogging about his experiences in Myanmar. Here, he reflects on his recent experience of the user-centered design process at Proximity Designs.  

    I’m new here, but I’ve been at Proximity long enough to realize that user-centered design is truly part of our DNA. Luckily, I was able to join in on an important part of that design process. As the energy team prepares to launch a new product, we traveled to Myanmar’s Dry Zone to gather concept feedback.

    By this stage, the team has already conducted and analyzed primary and secondary market research. Equipped with poster-board prototypes illustrating the potential products we’d like to offer, the Energy Team went back into the field to gather feedback on these potential solutions.

    In the course of 3 days, the team visited three villages, received 131 survey responses, and held focus group discussions at each location. It was an exhausting, eye opening experience that helped me to identify four conditions that were critical for the success of our concept feedback gathering and our overall design process.

    1) Quickly building rapport helps everyone to open up:

    Standing in front of a group of villagers, I was a bit nervous. But breaking the ice was critical for both them and me. To lead frank discussions, the team needs to make villagers who attend feel comfortable enough to share their preferences and experiences. On our end, I also had to be comfortable interacting with them. So after a deep breath, I stumbled through an introduction in basic Burmese and got some laughs from the group. It was heartening to see that some participants were so interested in the products that they stuck around after the formal session. Discussions with them led to in-depth learning about Myanmar rural energy needs. 

    2) Structure helps to simplify information exchange and keeps respondents focused.

    Direct interaction with villagers is incredibly valuable, but time is limited, and attendees, just like any of us, lose focus over time. We prepared with questionnaires, clipboards, and pens, and we asked villagers to gather in groups monitored by one of our team members. All of these groups were kept on track by a team member who “mc’d” the event. Visuals aids are also incredibly important to help communicate complicated product options. We had large vinyl sheets printed with visual mock-ups that could be hung from one of the village houses.

    3) Listen to what isn’t being said, and observe the environment.

    Listening is a basic human function, but it’s surprising how quickly we can forget to be attentive if we focus on ticking through a laundry list of questions. Sometimes slowing down, and really listening, makes all the difference.

    “Listening,” extends not only to the words people are saying along with their gestures, but also includes paying attention to the kind of environments, cultures, and norms where people live. This sort of observation, or “listening,” helped me understand what can sometimes be difficult to articulate.

    For example, during one village visit, the women sat on one side of the space, the men sat on the opposite side, and the village leaders sat in the middle. This observation provides insight about the decision hierarchy that may exist in the village and how we should approach introducing a new product.

    4) Remember the stakeholders who may not be center stage.

    When designing a product or service for a group of people, it is critical to consider who, besides the end user, will be important in implementing that solution. In our case, our energy sales team and other Proximity staff who interact with villagers on a day-to-day basis will be directly involved in getting products to our customers. Some of these people have grown up in the same villages where we will be selling products and serve as a bridge between Proximity and the end-user. We used a focus-group setup to get their input on the various proposed solutions.

    Reflecting on the experience, I’ve realized how important it is to remember that we’re all people, not simply data points or information reserves. Trying to connect with individuals, as well as simply enjoying and appreciating the experience, goes a long way.

    All photos courtesy of Steve Frechette.