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    Entries in ko thein soe (1)

    Thursday
    Feb262015

    What is it like to work at Proximity for 11 years?

    Ko Thein Soe is known at Proximity as ‘The Energizer Bunny.’ Even after eleven years with the organization, he’s still winning awards for his sales performance.  On a recent trip to the Upper Delta Region, we sat down with him to learn about his views on climate change, what keeps him motivated, and his sales secret.

    You’ve been at Proximity since we sold our first pump in late 2004. Can you tell us a little what life for farmers was like when you were getting started? 

    KTS: Before 2004, people in this region only grew vegetables seasonally, from May until November, while the rains lasted. Even though they knew it was possible to grow vegetables for longer, there was no easy access to water. Then, in 2004, another iNGO I can’t remember the name of it right now came to educate people about the benefits of tube wells. The tube wells together with Proximity's treadle pumps helped people access water for irrigation more easily. They could grow vegetables year round. 

    So now that more farmers have their own tube wells and pumps, what are the main challenges that farmers in this region are facing? 

    KTS: There are two main challenges. The first is financing, because people here need about ten lakh (1 lakh= roughly US $100) to buy all the inputs for a rice harvest. If they can get a loan to buy seeds and fertilizers, farmers can't pay any of it back for at least four months. Otherwise, they will not have time to grow and sell the rice before their payments are due. The second challenge is a lack of ‘know-how.’ Even rich farmers can be adversely affected and lose money if they don’t know how to properly grow their crops, so that knowledge is very valuable. 

    What about climate change? Is that a big problem here? 

    KTS: The effects of climate change are felt in the area, and unseasonal rains are becoming more common. It’s difficult for farmers to recover, but it’s not disastrous. Most often, if rains come at the wrong time, then we have to dry the rice twice. It will make it break more often, so we’ll get lower prices for it at the market. Farmers also face more pest outbreaks, but the problem is not too overwhelming in the Upper Delta, at least not yet.  

    You’re a farmer yourself, right? 

    KTS: Yes. I own 20 acres. I grow beans, pulses and rice. 

    How do you manage to run a farm and work as a sales rep for Proximity?

    KTS: Before I worked at Proximity I was solely a farmer. Now my wife manages the farm. She’s very happy with my job, because now she makes an important contribution to our family’s income.  We’ve also been able to open up a small grocery shop in our house thanks to savings from my job.

    You’ve been with Proximity for over a decade, and still, every year, you’re winning awards for your strong sales performance. What keeps you motivated?

    KTS: As a sales rep, you have to have a genuine will to help people. When you feel reluctant to go into a new village, you need to tap into that [desire to help]. If you adopt a mindset of trying to help people, then you don’t see just your personal goals or sales targets. You see that the work you are doing is helping to build up communities and is building networks between different people and villages. 

    How does your work build networks?

    KTS: As a sales rep, I have to travel and talk to a lot of farmers. I have to learn about the different varieties of vegetables that they’re growing, and how those varieties are doing [in order to advise them on Proximity’s products]. I learn what varieties [of vegetables] do best in this region, so I get to help local communities by spreading the knowledge I gain from visiting so many farms. In my village, I am considered ‘someone who knows,’ and this makes me feel proud. They also joke around that now I am a ‘rich farmer.’

    What are some of the things that your family has been able to enjoy, now that you and your wife earn revenue from so many different sources?

    KTS: I have two sons, one in 1st grade and one in 8th grade. I’m proud that both of them have smart phones, because it will be easier for them to learn about computers later on if they’re already familiar with technology. 

    Do you have a smartphone?

    KTS: No (laughs).

    And what are your hopes for your children’s lives? Do you want them to be farmers like you?

    KTS: I want them to be outstanding human beings, who also work to give back to their communities. In my village, there are people who have university degrees, but no proper jobs. For me, it’s more important that my children are able to use whatever they learn and apply it in their daily life. My younger son is always winning prizes at school. The elder one behaves more like a teenager, but I hope they will both be successful.

    What’s your advice for other sales reps?

    KTS: This job is not about the money. Whenever you don’t make a sale, don’t take it personally. Remember this job is about helping people.