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    Entries in myanmar money report (1)

    Monday
    Jul212014

    Where a project lives and breathes

    Pop-up studio in Kalaw. Photo courtesy of Jan Chipchase 

    It’s hard to be inspired in an uninspiring setting. Which is why, when seeking to do to top-notch research and design work with the folks at Studio D, we set up a pop-up studio to enable the creative juices to flow.

    A what? Think about it: a dynamic, varied workspace tailored exclusively for a particular project. Instead of retreating into some sterile hotel every night, imagine working in a cabin up in the hills of Kalaw or in a family home in North Dagon. Pop-up studios are set up in places that are rich in personality and that allow teams to be closer to the the people whose lives they are trying to affect.

    The aim is to tailor a space so that it lends itself to creative work, one with lots of natural light and varied work settings both indoors and outdoors.  No wall is taboo at a pop-up studio, and by using the space itself for ideation and brainstorming, teams can come up with dynamic solutions while remaining aware of what each member is working on. Because every day's data is synthesized into short insights on the walls, teams get just the right amount of exposure to promote creativity, without getting bogged down under massive amounts of notes. On a tour of our most recent pop-up studio, set up with Studio D to develop financial inclusion services for rural Myanmar, visitors are able to follow the trail of diagrams and notes throughout the two-story house and physically see the thinking processes that led the team to the final prototype service we’ll be developing in the coming months.

    Essentially, a pop-up studio is the place where a project lives and breathes. Everything in that space is about the project. Too often, inspiration can’t be confined to the hours between 9 and 5, so one of the main benefits of a pop-up studio is establishing a space where inspiration is welcomed 24/7. It naturally lends itself to informal meetings and to a casual community living atmosphere that makes work processes enjoyable and playful.

    Our team de-briefs in Kalaw. Photo courtesy of Jan Chipchase

    With the advent of open offices, we’ve seen companies gain ever more awareness of how the space in which people work affects the quality and creativity of that work. The pop-up studio brings the dynamism of the most successful open offices to any place in the world. It’s a cost-effective way to spark creativity and to help a team live and breathe a project for its duration, which might, we admit, get intense at times, unless the projects are also motivating. In the words of Studio D's Lauren Serota

    “the work we’re doing is really fun, so it’s good to be living in it.”

    We’ll readily admit we’re a little geeky at Proximity (and we think our partners at Studio D agree), because we’ve totally embraced this opportunity to live amidst the ideas we’ve been cooking up for the past 6 weeks. 

    If you want to find out what they are, join us on July 29th at TS1 in Yangon for an open studio event about our most recent service design work with Studio D.

    And to read more about pop-up studios, check out  Jan Chipchase’s booklet on the subject. 

     

    Studio D members brainstorming in North Dagon. Photo by Claudia Sofia Sosa